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Channel Matters Blog > April 2015
by Rich Blakeman
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I'm not sure if it was Mario Puzo's writing, or Michael Corleone's words coming out in The Godfather that first popularized this notion. According to Michael, "It's not personal, Sonny. It's strictly business." The concept got legs from there, getting more popular when repeated by Tom Hanks in You've Got Mail or personalized by George Clooney as the outsourced downsizing consultant in Up in the Air. There is a very popular notion that when things get tough, you have to revert to this mindset to compete and win.
by Rich Blakeman
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Abstract
Customer retention and winning repeat business poses a unique challenge for channel organizations. When channel partners are responsible for direct interaction with the customer, the vendor loses visibility into the customer base. If challenges or opportunities arise, vendors are often the last to know
by Stan White
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The other day, I saw a statistic that said 78% of Millenials would choose to spend money on an experience over a tangible product. At first the idea seemed a bit strange, perhaps because I come from a generation that valued things you could touch: a car, a house and 2.5 kids. But after I gave it a little more thought, I decided that the attitude of the Millenials isn't all that different from the attitude of most buyers today.

by Rich Blakeman
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fairness.jpgThere's a well-known story about a lady that called into a Fargo radio show to suggest the city move its deer-crossing signs because it was too dangerous for the deer to cross in such high-traffic areas. My friends in Fargo tell me the caller was just a hoax. (And they also claim they aren't like the movie, either!)
 
by Jan de Leon
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Back in the mid-80s, Jan Carlzon, the President and CEO of SAS Group, wrote a book that was translated into English as Moments of Truth. While I don't know that it ever achieved the same level of sales, for me the concepts were on par with those found in such classics as Good to Great (Jim Palmer) and In Search of Excellence (Tom Peters). Looking back, I think they might even have been more important for today's sales organizations because Moments of Truth minced no words when it came to where the focus needed to be — on the customer.